Truth About Energy Systems FREE Video

A few weeks ago I gave a lecture on energy systems at the Central Virginia Sports Performance Seminar at the University of Richmond in Virginia. For everyone who wasn’t able to attend the lecture or watch it live online, you can now see the presentation in its entirety and you can even download my lecture powerpoint slides.

Feel free to leave comments or questions and make sure to share the video

EXCEL TEMPLATE

energy systems trainingPlease note that the excel file discussed in the video is now only available as part of the Strength In Motion Seminar DVD

It will not be emailed out separately but you can find it, along with a 1 hour video explaining how to use it, within the seminar

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Comments

  1. Hey, I’m really big fan of your site, and I just watched the presentation. I was thinking of creating a Bio Force Index out of excel, but you mentioned that you could e-mail the excel chart if someone was intrested in it to their e-mail? If so, my e-mail is heychow1986@yahoo.com.

    Really appreciate the information you provide on your website!

    1. They have higher lactic development than MMA because the rounds are much shorter, but they still have very well developed aerobic systems as well. Wrestling requires pretty balanced energy system development.

  2. Joel,

    Awesome presentation. Can’t wait to hear your presentation at the Sounders mentorship as well as meet you. Finally got your book and ready to take in the new info.

    Regards,
    Casey

  3. Joel I have sent this video to Anatomy/Exercise & Physiology department of my University. I think it summarizes a lot of components very well.

  4. Joel:

    Thanks for posting the presentation. On slide 30, you present 2 pie charts showing energy systems’ contribution to 2 successive bouts of 30-second sprints. Where did this data come from? I reviewed the Hamilton study cited on the slide, but did not see the corresponding source of slide info in the study.

    Thanks, neil

    1. There were two different pieces of research those slides came from. I’ll have to look up the sources again and post them but you’ll only be able to find the charts if you have access to the full text. Look at Dave Tenney’s article on Alactic-Aerobic for soccer, I believe he has the sources in there for at least one of them.

      1. Thanks for your swift reply. Found the references in Dave’s post (Parolin et. al. 1994, and Neville et. al. 1999). The Parolin study, cited by name at the end of Dave’s post, is available for free online. I checked it and could not find reference to 30s maximal bouts (it deals with 15min moderate efforts). I’m also unable to locate a study by Neville et. al. Any help you might provide in confirming these sources would be greatly appreciated. I’m specifically trying to track down the evidence that 30s max. sprints require sig. aerobic contributions and increasing aerobic % as intervals increase in #. Would seem to have tremendous explanatory power re: high-intensity endurance training…

          1. What do you mean no luck confirming the data? Do you have full text access to those studies?

          2. I have full text access to Parolin. I could not locate data that supports Dave’s article or your presentation. I do not know what Neville study Dave cites (he does not say) but the hamilton/neville study in your preso does not appear to have the data you and Dave present. Not trying to challenge the presentations, just looking to learn more from the sources… Thanks

          3. You sure you’re looking at the right study? Parolin 1999 “Regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase and PDH during maximal intermittent exercise”
            http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/277/5/E890.full There is all kinds of data in there that supports what Dave and I present, it’s clear even by looking at the abstract “As each bout progressed and with successive bouts, there was a decreasing ability to stimulate substrate phosphorylation through phosphocreatine hydrolysis and glycolysis and a shift toward greater reliance on oxidative phosphorylation.” What are you looking for exactly?

            I believe this is the reference Dave is referring to: G. C. Bogdanis, M. E. Nevill, L. H. Boobis, and H. K. A. Lakomy, “Contribution of phosphocreatine and aerobic metabolism to energy supply during repeated sprint exercise,” Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 80, no. 3, pp. 876–884, 1996

          4. Thanks. Was not looking at the right Parolin study. Now I am. Thanks for the Bogdanis reference. This is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you!

  5. Joel, nice presentation, thanks for sharing.

    Any information on what the pole vaulter with a resting HR of 48 was doing for aerobic development or not?

  6. enjoyed the presentation Joel..working with professional soccer team (youth) in the UK, like the excel model (can you send to t.cooper@sussex.ac.uk), have definitely seen a reliance on long term anaerobic in the team, quick and powerful…but not for long.

    Great stuff Joel

  7. Great presentation! As a college swim coach I have always wondered about the aerobic / anaerobic breakdowns you see in texts. In fact I’ve gone back and done some research and believe that the orginal breakdowns in the 50’s 60’s were pretty close, then 70’s 80’s they revised up the anaerobic contributions. One of the greatest coaches of the 20th century, Arthur Lydiard, would be rolling over in his grave because he is so happy to here you talk about the importance of aerobic training in many events. Book I would recommend is “Healthy Intelligent training” for an up to date review of his classic training plans. He had a guy, Peter Snell, run a 1:44.3 800m in 1962 on GRASS, still the auzzie and new zeeland record almost 50 years later! Pretty good I think. I to would love a copy of the excel matrix file. Please send to mkeeler@sandiego.edu

    Keep up the good work

  8. Joel,
    Thanks for posting your presentation. I’m about halfway through your book and am finding it to be one of the best resources I own. I would appreciate it if you could send me the excel model you mentioned in the presentation to rjohnson@desu.edu. I appreciate it.

    1. Joel,
      I have read your book and found both it and the presentation vary helpful in my MMA training. I would also very much appreciate it if you could send me your excel doc that you talk about in the presentation.
      Thanks
      hansna@gmail.com

  9. I have the book and DVD. Man, tons of info to digest. I got caught up in all the intervals, 400’s, tabatas ect. I ran the cooper test and thought I was going to fall out. Aerobic system is weak. Thank you so much for the work and the video.

    I like the others would love the excel sheet as well. Charles.stage@yahoo.com

    Thanks sir.

  10. Hi Joel
    Just recently came across your site. Love the information and great presentation! Could you send me the excel model you mentioned too? styndel@hotmail.com Thank you

    ps I tried sending an email to the website but wasn’t sure if you received it?

  11. Hi Joel, it might be a bit late to ask for the excel file you mentioned in the presentation. but hopefully you could send it over if you find the time. Regards and thanks as always.

    chris.kilmurray (at) gmail.com

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