Archives for: Training Principles

3 Things to STOP doing if you want better conditioning

3 things to stop doing to improve your conditioning

Whatever your motivation for wanting to improve your conditioning may be, you’ve likely scoured the internet and sites like 8WeeksOut to try to figure out exactly what you should be doing to get in better shape. And I’m sure that you’ve found a mountain of information. On this site alone you can find a ton of articles – 5 ways to improve your conditioning, 3 tips to stop gassing out, 3 new conditioning rules, 8 principles that will transform your conditioning, etc.…Read More

Strength Hacking with HRV

Jim Laird

Training has changed dramatically over the years. In the 6th-century BC, Milo of Croton would carry a calf on his shoulders every day until it became a full-sized bull. Unknowingly, Milo was in the process of discovering the principle of progressive overload. Simply put, the calf got bigger over time and Milo had to respond. As a result of his labor, Milo’s muscles adapted to the workload by getting bigger and stronger.…Read More

So You Want to Become a Fighter

become a fighter


Just about every day I check my email and see messages from aspiring fighters who want to know the secrets to turning their passion into a successful career.  Sometimes the questions are simple— How do you prepare an Epsom salt bath for a last-minute weight cut?— and sometimes they could be the subject for an entire book—What kind of periodization do you recommend for an amateur fighter?Read More

Building a bulletproof mind

special operator


This article is going to focus on the psychological training process we use to prepare people for SOF (special operations force) selections. This framework develops baseline skills that are later refined in the selection and training environment.…Read More

3 Exercises that will Improve Your Snatch

improve your snatch


The traditional squat snatch is without a doubt one of the most difficult barbell movements to grasp. If a boulder fell on someone laying on their back, odds are they will push the boulder off by performing something that looks like a bench press. If I asked that same person to pick up something heavy or stand up with a sandbag across their back, they would perform something that resembles a squat or deadlift. However, the same logic cannot be applied to a classical snatch.…Read More

3 New Conditioning Rules

New Conditioning Rules

  Considering that we’re on the brink of the training technology revolution, with more fitness devices and gadgets becoming available almost daily, it’s surprising that in many ways, conditioning is still in the dark ages. If you were to go back in time and watch conditioning sessions for teams and athletes 50 years ago, chances…Read More

Conditioning and Mental Toughness

mental toughness


The term “mental toughness” has become a popular buzzword in strength, conditioning, and fitness circles lately. These days, people are even paying good money to run themselves through brutal military style obstacle courses and endurance races – all in the name of proving and developing their mental toughness.…Read More

Special Operator Programming

Special-Operator-Programming


This is part 2 of a series of articles on special operator training. If you missed part 1, check it out here.  In this article I’m going to be covering the general structure that I use to prepare people for special operations selections programs and for active duty operators.…Read More

The Ultimate Conditioning Guide

IMG_6971


If you’ve been through a few of our articles, you may have noticed a common thread.  In fact, the majority of my posts are elaborations of a few core principles of conditioning and fitness. The truth is that having great conditioning really isn’t as difficult as a lot of people make it out to be, but it’s also much more than just working running yourself into the ground over and over again as far too many people often do.…Read More

3 Tips to Stop Gassing Out

Conditioning in the ring

 

Any time a fighter ends up gassed out and face down on the canvas, the simple reaction is to point the finger at a lack of conditioning as the cause. Everyone from forum warriors to fight commentators alike often leap to this conclusion, quickly writing off the loss with discussions of how he or she must not have trained hard enough or worked on conditioning sufficiently to last through the fight.…Read More

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